The Day of the Lord – 1 Thessalonians 5

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Readiness (5:1–11)

Just as Paul had reminded the Thessalonians earlier, “You received from us how you ought to walk” (1 Thess. 4:1), so in 1 Thess. 5:1 Paul again notes, “You have no need that I should write to you.” Continue reading The Day of the Lord – 1 Thessalonians 5

Purity, Love, and Hope – 1 Thessalonians 4

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Personal Purity (4:1–8)

While the book of 1 Thessalonians is only five chapters in length, as Paul begins chapter four, he finally starts to address questions raised by the church. Indeed, it may be helpful to view chapters one through three as a type of lengthy introduction, for Paul begins chapter four writing, “Finally then, brethren . . .” (1 Thess. 4:1). Continue reading Purity, Love, and Hope – 1 Thessalonians 4

Love for the Church – 1 Thessalonians 3

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Concern of Paul (3:1–5)

In 1 Thess. 2:17–20 Paul had mentioned his desire to see the Thessalonian believers. Recall that after his three-week ministry in Thessalonica (cf. Acts 17:1–9), Paul was forced to leave the city and to flee, which landed him in Berea (cf. Acts 17:10–15). Continue reading Love for the Church – 1 Thessalonians 3

Effect of the Gospel – 1 Thessalonians 2

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Sharing the Gospel (2:1–12)

Thus far in his epistle, Paul’s approach to encouraging the believers in Thessalonica has been two-fold. First, Paul reminded the church of their identity in Christ, as he noted that they were “in . . . the Lord Jesus Christ” (1 Thess. 1:1), that they were “elect by God” (1 Thess. 1:4), and that they had believed the message of the gospel (cf. 1 Thess. 1:6). Continue reading Effect of the Gospel – 1 Thessalonians 2

1 Thessalonians: Introduction – 1 Thessalonians 1

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Authorship and Date – The book of 1 Thessalonians was written by the apostle Paul (1 Thess. 1:1; 2:18) while he was on his second missionary journey. This letter was likely penned between AD 51–52 from the city of Corinth. Continue reading 1 Thessalonians: Introduction – 1 Thessalonians 1

Family Wisdom – Proverbs 31

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Mother’s Wisdom (31:1–7)

The book of Proverbs ends with two poems that can be titled: A Mother’s Advice (cf. Prov. 31:1–9) and An Excellent Wife (cf. Prov. 31:10–31). These poems are identified as originating with King Lemeul’s mother. Continue reading Family Wisdom – Proverbs 31

The Wisdom of Agur – Proverbs 30

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Source of Wisdom (30:1–9)

In our first week of study, we noted that Solomon wrote most of the proverbs in this book. Yet, the book itself identifies other authors who contributed to the text, including: Hezekiah’s servants, Agur, and Lemuel. Continue reading The Wisdom of Agur – Proverbs 30

General Wisdom – Proverbs 29

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Righteous Relationships (29:1–7)

As is the case in the larger section of this book (i.e., Prov. 10–29), so here in this chapter we see that Solomon addresses a variety of issues. A common theme in Prov. 29:1–7 is that in these first few verses Solomon addresses several different relationships in which man engages. Continue reading General Wisdom – Proverbs 29

Appetites and Wisdom – Proverbs 23

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Beware of Envy (23:1–8)

Given mankind’s fallen nature, one of the temptations with which we often struggle is controlling our human appetites (e.g., food, drink, sex, sleep, etc.). Furthermore, we often struggle over envying others who have a greater ability than us to gratify their own desires. Continue reading Appetites and Wisdom – Proverbs 23

Providence and Wisdom – Proverbs 21

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Providence, Plans, and Work (21:1–8)

As with the other chapters in the current section of this book (cf. Prov. 10–29), Proverbs 21 contains a wide variety of proverbs that apply wisdom to many different areas of life. Continue reading Providence and Wisdom – Proverbs 21